Dorothy parker and robert benchley relationship

Robert Benchley - New World Encyclopedia

dorothy parker and robert benchley relationship

Robert Benchley and Dorothy Parker 'In Broadway Playhouses': Middlebrow Theatricality .. Nathan forged a curious relationship between drama criticism and. Robert Benchley, photographed for Vanity Fair in the late s. . banquet further strained the relationship between Benchley and his superiors. Robert Emmet Sherwood and future friend and collaborator Dorothy Parker. Dorothy Parker and best friend (and fellow Round Tabler) Robert Benchley in Inseparable, Robert & Dorothy were in love with each other.

His re-entry into public speaking followed the annual Harvard—Yale football game inwhere he presented a practical joke involving "Professor Soong" giving a question-and-answer session on football in Chinese. In what the local press dubbed "the Chinese professor caper," Soong was played by a Chinese-American who had lived in the United States for over thirty years, and pretended to answer questions in Chinese while Benchley "translated.

While Benchley's pieces were bought by Vanity Fair from time to time, his consistent work dried up, and he took a position with the New York Tribune. He was a very poor one, unable to get statements from people quoted in other papers, and eventually had greater success covering lectures around the city. He was promised a position at the Tribune's Sunday magazine when it launched, and he was moved to the magazine's staff soon after he was hired, eventually becoming chief writer.

He wrote two articles a week: The liberty gave his work new life, and the success of his pieces in the magazine convinced his editors to give him a signed byline column in the Tribune proper. Wodehouse at Vanity Fair at the beginning ofreviewing theatre in New York. This inspired staff at the Tribune magazine to creativity for articles such as arranging for the producers of The Thirteenth Chair to cast Benchley as a corpsebut the situation at the magazine deteriorated as the pacifist Benchley became unhappy with the Tribune's position on World War Iand the Tribune editors were unhappy with the evolving tone and irreverence of the magazine.

Inthe Tribune shut down the magazine, and Benchley was out of work again. When a rumored opening for an editorial position at Vanity Fair fell through, Benchley decided he would continue freelancing, having made a name for himself at the magazine.

When a position as press agent for Broadway producer William A. Brady was offered, Benchley accepted it, against the advice of many of his peers. This experience was a poor one, as Brady was extremely difficult to work for. Benchley resigned to become a publicity director for the federal government's Aircraft Board at the beginning of His experience there was not much better, and when an opportunity was offered to return to the Tribune under new editorial management, Benchley took it.

The two were given a good deal of freedom, but Benchley's coverage of the war and focus on African-American regiments as well as provocative pictorials about lynching in the southern United States earned him and Gruening scrutiny from management. Amid accusations that both were pro-German the United States was fighting Germany at the timeBenchley tendered his resignation in a terse letter, citing the lack of "rational proof that Dr.

Gruening was guilty of Benchley took this offer to Vanity Fair to see if they would match it, as he felt Vanity Fair was the better magazine, and Vanity Fair offered him the position of managing editor. From Toronto Leacock closely followed the increasing body of Benchley's published humor and wit, and opened correspondence between them.

He admitted to occasional borrowing of a Benchley topic for his own reflection and writings. Eventually, he began lobbying gently for Benchley to compile his columns into book form, and in was delighted with the result of his nagging. For his part — in a tribute to Leacock — Benchley later said he wrote everything Leacock ever wrote. They had a marvelous friendship. The format of Vanity Fair fit Benchley's style very well, allowing his columns to have a humorous tone, often as straight parodies.

Some of Benchley's columns, featuring a character he created, were attributed to his pseudonym Brighton Perry, but he took credit for most of them himself.

When the editorial managers went on a European trip, the three took advantage of the situation, writing articles mocking the local theatre establishment and offering parodic commentary on a variety of topics, such as the effect of Canadian hockey on United States fashion. This worried Sherwood, as he felt it could jeopardize his forthcoming raise. They sent out a memo forbidding the discussion of salaries in an attempt to rein in the staff. Benchley, Parker, and Sherwood responded with a memo of their own, followed by placards around their necks detailing their exact salaries for all to see.

Robert Benchley - Wikipedia

Management attempted to issue "tardy slips" for staff who were late. On one of these, Benchley wrote out, in very small handwriting, an elaborate excuse involving a herd of elephants on 44th Street. These issues contributed to a general deterioration of morale in the offices, culminating in Parker's termination, allegedly due to complaints by the producers of the plays she skewered in her theatrical reviews. Upon learning of her termination, Benchley tendered his own resignation. Word of it was published in Time by Alexander Woollcottwho was at a lunch with Benchley, Parker, and others.

Given that Benchley had two children at the time of his resignation, Parker referred to it as "the greatest act of friendship I'd ever seen.

According to legend, he submitted a magazine piece titled "I Like to Loaf" two weeks after deadline. A theatrical production by the members of the Round Table was put together in response to a challenge from actor J.

Kerriganwho was tired of the Table's complaints about the ongoing theatre season. The revue was applauded by both spectators and fellow actors, with Benchley's performance receiving the biggest laughs.

While the session did not yield significant results, Benchley did get writing credit for producing the title cards on the Raymond Griffith silent film You'd Be Surprised released Septemberand was invited to do some titling for two other films. This experience was not as positive, and most of Benchley's contributions were excised and the final product, Funny Facedid not have Benchley's name attached. Worn down, Benchley moved to his next commitment, an attempt at a talkie version of "The Treasurer's Report".

The filming went by quickly, and though he was convinced he was not good, The Treasurer's Report was a financial and critical success upon its release in He did especially well in his English and government classes. His humor and style began to reveal itself during this time; Benchley was often called upon to entertain his fraternity brothers, and his impressions of classmates and professors became very popular.

His performances gave him some local fame, and most entertainment programs on campus and many off-campus meetings recruited Benchley's talents.

He was elected to the Lampoon's board of directors in his third year. The Lampoon position opened a number of other doors for Benchley, and he was quickly nominated to the Signet Society meeting club as well as becoming the only undergraduate member of the Boston Papyrus Club at the time.

Another English professor recommended that Benchley speak with the Curtis Publishing Company; but Benchley was initially against the idea, and ultimately took a position at a civil service office in Philadelphia. Owing to an academic failure in his senior year due to an illness, [15] Benchley would not receive his Bachelor of Arts from Harvard until the completion of his credits inand took a position with Curtis shortly after he received his diploma.

His re-entry into public speaking followed the annual Harvard—Yale football game inwhere he presented a practical joke involving "Professor Soong" giving a question-and-answer session on football in China. In what the local press dubbed "the Chinese professor caper," Soong was played by a Chinese-American who had lived in the United States for over thirty years, and pretended to answer questions in Chinese while Benchley "translated.

While Benchley's pieces were bought by Vanity Fair from time to time, his consistent work dried up, and Benchley took a position with the New York Tribune. He was a very poor one, unable to get statements from people quoted in other papers, and eventually had greater success covering lectures around the city. He was promised a position at the Tribune's Sunday magazine when it launched, and he was moved to the magazine's staff soon after he was hired, eventually becoming chief writer.

He wrote two articles a week; the first a review of non-literary books, the other a feature-style article about whatever he wanted. The liberty gave his work new life, and the success of his pieces in the magazine convinced his editors to give him a signed byline column in the Tribune proper. Wodehouse at Vanity Fair at the beginning ofreviewing theater in New York. The experience at Vanity Fair inspired Benchley's fellow staff at the Tribune magazine with creative topics for articles such as arranging for the producers of The Thirteenth Chair to cast Benchley as a corpsebut the situation at the magazine deteriorated as the pacifist Benchley became unhappy with the Tribune's position on World War Iand the Tribune editors were unhappy with the evolving tone and irreverence of the magazine.

Inthe Tribune shut down the magazine, and Benchley was out of work again. When a rumored opening for an editorial position at Vanity Fair fell through, Benchley decided he would continue freelancing, having made a name for himself at the magazine.

When a job as a press agent for Broadway producer William A. Brady was offered, Benchley took the position against the advice of many of his peers. This experience was a poor one, as Brady was extremely difficult to work for, and Benchley resigned to became a publicity director for the federal government's Aircraft Board at the beginning of His experience there was not much better, and when an opportunity was offered to return to the Tribune under new editorial management, Benchley took it.

The two were given a good deal of freedom, but Benchley's coverage of the war and focus on African-American regiments as well as provocative pictorials about lynching in the southern United States earned him and Gruening scrutiny from management. Amid accusations that both were pro- German the United States was fighting Germany at the timeBenchley tendered his resignation in a terse letter, citing the lack of "rational proof that Dr.

Dorothy Parker

Gruening was guilty of…charges made against him…" and management's attempts to "smirch the character and the newspaper career of the first man in three years who has been able to make the Tribune look like a newspaper.

Benchley took this offer to Vanity Fair to see if they could match it, as he felt Vanity Fair was the better magazine, and Vanity Fair offered him the position of managing editor.

dorothy parker and robert benchley relationship

The format of Vanity Fair fit Benchley's style very well, allowing his columns to have a humorous tone, often as straight parodies. Some of Benchley's columns, featuring a character he created, were attributed to his pseudonym Brighton Perry, but most were attributed to Benchley himself. When the editorial managers went on a European trip, the three took advantage of the situation, writing articles mocking the local theater establishment and offering parodic commentary on a variety of topics, such as the effect of Canadian hockey on United States fashion.

dorothy parker and robert benchley relationship

This worried Sherwood, as he felt it could jeopardize his forthcoming raise. The management sent out a memo forbidding the discussion of salaries in an attempt to reign in the staff.

Benchley, Parker, and Sherwood responded with a memo of their own, followed by placards around their necks detailing their exact salaries for all to see. Management attempted to issue "tardy slips" for staff who were late; on one of these, Benchley filled out, in very small handwriting, an elaborate excuse involving a herd of elephants on 44th Street. These issues contributed to a general deterioration of morale in the offices, culminating in Parker's termination, allegedly due to complaints by the producers of the plays she skewered in her theatrical reviews.

She had a number of affairs, her lovers including reporter-turned-playwright Charles MacArthur and the publisher Seward Collins. Her relationship with MacArthur resulted in a pregnancy.

Parker is alleged to have said, "how like me, to put all my eggs into one bastard. What would become a lifelong commitment to activism began in when she became concerned about the pending executions of Sacco and Vanzetti. Parker travelled to Boston to protest the proceedings. They married two years later in Raton, New Mexico. Campbell's mixed parentage was the reverse of Parker's: She learned that he was bisexual and later proclaimed in public that he was " queer as a billy goat".

She wrote additional dialogue for The Little Foxes in After the United States entered the Second World War, Parker and Alexander Woollcott collaborated to produce an anthology of her work as part of a series published by Viking Press for servicemen stationed overseas. With an introduction by Somerset Maugham[40] the volume compiled over two dozen of Parker's short stories, along with selected poems from Enough Rope, Sunset Gun, and Death and Taxes. Hers is one of three Portable series, including volumes devoted to William Shakespeare and The Bible, that have remained in continuous print.

dorothy parker and robert benchley relationship

During the Great Depressionshe was among numerous American intellectuals and artists who became involved in related social movements. According to David Cauteits often wealthy members were "able to contribute as much to [Communist] Party funds as the whole American working class", although they may not have been intending to support the Party cause.

Perelman at a party in and, despite a rocky start Perelman called it "a scarifying ordeal", [48] they remained friends for the next 35 years. They became neighbors when the Perelmans helped Parker and Campbell buy a run-down farm in Bucks County, Pennsylvanianear New Hopea popular summer destination among many writers and artists from New York.

Parker was listed as a Communist by the publication Red Channels in