Shrek 2 meet the cast of duck

Shrek 2 - Wikipedia

shrek 2 meet the cast of duck

This is a list of characters that appear in the Shrek franchise and spin-offs from it. He begins the series as an unsociable hermit until he meets his soon-to-be best friend, Donkey. Puss first appears in Shrek 2, much like Dragon in the first film. to take the Golden Goose back, he is bathing and playing the rubber duck. Jim Gaffigan, Carl Reiner Join Voice Cast of Animated Movie 'Duck Duck Goose' Jeff Sneider | February 2, @ AM Last Updated: February 2, @ PM have overseen such animated movies as “Shrek,” “Cloudy with a Chance of . "Just take the damn meeting and pretend you're disarming so we can. 5, Shrek 2 was a hit of historic proportions in theaters. A minute "Meet the Cast" has interviews and portraits of the actors and their.

The character also required an upgrade in the fur shader for his introduction in the film. Pinocchio's campaign was the "honesty" campaign, while Gingy's was a "smear" campaign. Director Andrew Adamson said it was overtly satiric and political, with many funny ideas, but "it was more intellectual than emotional". Other than that there are my own influences, which are classical paintings from the 15th and 16th centuries, but those are not as direct.

In fact, nothing was absolutely direct. The design of Shrek is always a twist on reality anyway, so we tried to [pack] as much detail and interest as we could in the imagery. List of songs featured in Shrek 2 The film's soundtrack features the song " Accidentally in Love " by Counting Crowswhich the band's singer and songwriter Adam Duritz believes "fits into the movie because it's the story of people who fall in love who weren't supposed to fall in love.

The mermaid that washes up on Shrek in the beginning of the film bears strong resemblance to Ariel from Disney's The Little Mermaid. The Fellowship of the Ring where the rings are forged and where the Ring "falls" onto Frodo's finger.

The trumpeter who continues playing after the rest of the group, when Fiona is receiving an invitation from her parents to return, is playing the original Hawaii Five-O theme song. They are introduced in Shrek 2 as little more than a stinger gag.

Audience members missed having Dragon in the film, as was revealed to the filmmakers during test screenings. Donkey is delighted, and dubs the dronkeys "our little mutant babies". The dronkeys have very little screen time in Shrek the Third. They appear initially to give Shrek a wake up call, then to bid farewell to Donkey before his journey with Shrek.

Near the film's climax, Donkey frees them from Prince Charming's capture. In addition, a few dronkeys make an appearance at the film's close, when Shrek and Fiona are caring for their newborn triplets. In the alternate universe, when Donkey is told he has children, he asks: They are featured playing with the ogre children of Shrek and Fiona and flying around while their mother dances. They have antlers and fly around in Donkey's Christmas story.

All the dronkeys love their parents, especially their father, and seem to have become good friends with the ogre triplets. The only individual to be given any semblance of a personality is Bananas, who has bright green irises that are noticeably wall-eyedand frequently sneezes small tongues of flame. Donkey refers to Bananas as "my special boy". Some confusion exists as to why one dronkey is missing in Shrek 2. When the dronkeys were first introduced in the film's post-credits scene, there were six, including a unique individual which was red like her mother.

She does not appear in Shrek the Third; this is a continuity error on the part of the filmmakers. In Shrek Forever After, the dronkeys are seen playing with Shrek's children, appeared at their birthday and also a cause of nuisance for Shrek. They are not seen in the alternate universe as they do not exist on that timeline.

The Dronkeys were absent from Scared Shrekless, and neither were they mentioned. Farkle indicated by the tuft of hair and Fergus are male, and Felicia is female indicated by a pink bow in her hair. Just as many minor characters are members of the staff crew, the Ogre Triplets are voiced by offspring of staff crew, gender of voice not always same as actor: In Shrek the Third, Fiona tries to talk Shrek into the possibility of parenthood by saying when they return to their swamp, there could be some little "ogre feet" too, but Shrek is too worried about his inexperience as a parent to pursue this idea right now.

Just as Shrek embarks on a journey with Donkey and Puss in Boots to find Artie, Fiona announces to Shrek that she is pregnant, and Shrek begins to panic internally. During the journey, Shrek dreams of hundreds of ogre babies, constantly getting into danger and him having trouble saving them. In the dream, they flood Shrek's house and laugh at Shrek while he is naked apart from his graduation hat.

He wakes up in another dream, where Donkey and Puss's faces have turned to that of the ogre babies. Shrek wakes up screaming and reveals to Puss and Donkey how shocked he is by this news. Donkey attempts to assure Shrek fatherhood will not ruin his life. Shrek says he is worried about ruining his child's life as ogres aren't known for being loving and nurturing.

His fears prove to be well-founded when he reveals to Artie his own abusive father, who tried to eat him. By the end of the film, they have been born and are shown playing around the swamp, Shrek and Fiona getting used to being their parents, with the help of Puss, Lillian, Donkey and Dragon.

Two of them pull Puss's tail and put a pacifier into his mouth. Another pulls some ear wax from Shrek's ear and uses it to draw pictures with its left hand.

Later that night, they are shown sleeping and snoring, all in one small baby cot. Shrek and Fiona constantly give them slug juice for drinks.

The ogre babies are shown prominently in the credits, along with Puss in Boots and Donkey. Two of the siblings are shown to like Puss, hugging him tightly and call him "Kitty".

Puss is displeased when they use him for tug-o-war. They are seen more in Shrek the Halls, enjoying the seasons with their father and ecstatically enjoying their first Christmas with their parents. When Donkey brings the others to enjoy the holidays with them, the ogre babies hug Puss too tightly, pat his back, and tug on his tail.

They enjoy various Christmas stories and get to see Santa Claus at the end. The triplets do not appear in the alternate universe in Shrek Forever After as Shrek and Fiona meet, but do not marry in that universe.

Shrek later finds Felicia's doll in his pocket, causing him to cry. As Shrek begins to disintegrate, he tells Fiona about their children, just before she kisses him, restoring the timeline. In Scared Shrekless, they appear at the beginning, scaring the trick or treaters in their skeleton costume.

They are later seen along with their father, using the three in a knight armor in Duloc, in order to make Donkey believe that Lord Farquaad's ghost is there as a prank. Queen Lillian makes her debut in Shrek 2.

Although initially surprised at Fiona's transformation into an ogre, she is understanding of what has happened and, seeing that her daughter is deeply in love, accepts Shrek into their family.

When King Harold is turned back into the Frog King at the end of the film, she still accepts him as she did years ago. She and Harold are a reference to The Frog Prince. In Shrek the Third, she is widowed and becomes a more determined character, leading the pack of princesses through a series of tunnels in the castle and breaking two walls with her head, whilst humming " My Favorite Things " and " A Spoonful of Sugar " songs originally sung by Julie Andrews in The Sound of Music and Mary Poppins, respectively.

She rallies the other princesses from being damsels in distress to independent fighters. It is revealed in the film that Fiona inherited her fighting skills from her mother Lillian asks "Well, you didn't think you got your fighting skills from your father, did you? After the film's finale, Lillian is seen in Shrek's swamp home, happily visiting her grandchildren and playing with Farkle, who throws up on her dress, referencing to the phrase,"When a baby throws up on you, it means it likes you.

She appears at her grandchildren's birthday party in "Shrek Forever After" and gets angry when she thinks that it was Shrek who licked the birthday cake, when it in fact was Donkey. Lillian is also seen in a number of flashbacks, showing her and Harold's decision to visit Rumpelstiltskin to free their daughter from the curse before Shrek saved her. In the alternate universe she and Harold disappear after signing over the kingdom to Rumpelstiltskin. Her last appearance is at the end of the film, still celebrating the children's birthday.

King Harold makes his debut in Shrek 2.

shrek 2 meet the cast of duck

When his daughter Fiona arrives at the castle with her new husband, he is surprised that they are both ogres. He had secretly made a promise to the Fairy Godmother that her son Prince Charming would marry Fiona. Harold hires Puss in Boots to assassinate Shrek, but then succumbs to guilt when Fiona finds out that Shrek is not around. When the Fairy Godmother asks Harold to give Fiona the potion that will cause her to fall in love with Prince Charming, he refuses at first, disgusted at this invasion of her free willbut he is forced to acquiesce by some dark threat of disclosure.

In the event, when Fiona states that she loves the old Shrek, rather the new one that Prince Charming is pretending to be, Harold swaps the cup containing the potion for his own. At the ball toward the end of the film, Harold saves Fiona and Shrek from a blast of magic from Fairy Godmother's wand, and it transforms him back into a frog, which is hinted to be his original form, meaning he was the Frog Prince before he married Queen Lillian.

Afterwards, Harold apologizes to Shrek and accepts him into the family, and as he decides to leave, believing that he is not the man Lillian wanted, she comforts him by saying that he is more of a man now than he ever was when he was a human.

King Harold makes a very brief appearance as a frog king in Shrek the Third, in which Shrek and Fiona fill in for him and Lillian during his illness, which later turns out to be terminal The story book The Legend of Shrek and other publications state that the transition from human to frog confused his age and accelerated the aging process. He tells Shrek on his deathbed that he and Fiona are next in line to the throne of Far Far Away, which Shrek rejects because he cannot imagine an ogre as king, given his inexperience and disastrous attempts to fill in for him.

Harold dies after telling Shrek about Fiona's cousin Arthur. King Harold makes his final appearance in Shrek Forever After, in which he appears very briefly in a couple of flashbacks. In the first, he and Lillian are about to make a deal with Rumpelstiltskin, but they break it off at the last moment. In the alternate reality of the second flashback, Harold and Lillian disappear after signing over the kingdom to Rumpelstiltskin.

At the end of the film, the original timeline is restored, leaving the current time a year or so after Harold's death as seen in Shrek the Third. However, there is a large painting of him in which the face moves, indicating that his spirit inhabits the picture.

Unlike the previous films, he is never seen in his frog form. She is based on one of Cinderella's two stepsisters. Unlike other ugly sisters, she is an ally and best friend to Fiona. She is first seen as an unusually masculine female bartender at the Poison Apple. She is depicted as a tall, independent woman with purple-themed clothes who wears Elizabeth Taylor style makeup. Her character design is intended to invoke the appearance of a drag queenwhich is supported with her masculine voice.

Doris is first seen in Shrek 2, when King Harold secretly enters the Poison Apple Club, in which she is working as a bartender. She recommends Puss In Boots to the king for the task of assassinating Shrek. Near the climax of the film, Doris points King Harold to a door guarded by the Fairy Godmother's bodyguards, behind which Prince Charming and the Fairy Godmother are secretly meeting.

At first, she has a crush on Prince Charming and forces him to kiss her at the end of the film. Mabel says that Doris does not belong here, and this indicates that Doris is living with Princess Fiona in the castle. She is also seen during Fiona's baby shower, but she escapes by a hidden trapdoor when Charming starts to enter the castle. Later, she is imprisoned by Charming after he invades Far Far Away.

With the princesses, Donkey and Puss, she escapes and infiltrates the castle to confront Charming. In the end, Doris and Mabel finally meet in Charming's play and reconcile when Artie convinces the villains not to continue their villainous ways when they didn't get their happily ever after.

Doris appears very briefly in Shrek Forever After at the ogre triplets' birthday party. She has a talent for singing, which she uses to charm animals and make them follow her orders. In the first film, Snow White cameos as one of the fairytale creatures to be banished to Shrek's swamp.

She is shown sleeping inside her coffin and being handled[ clarification needed ] by her seven dwarves. When Lord Farquaad is forced to choose a wife, Snow White, seen sleeping in the glass coffin, is his second choice. At Shrek and Fiona's wedding, she fights with Cinderella to catch Fiona's bouquet. In Shrek 2, Snow White is briefly mentioned when the Fairy Godmother is explaining to Shrek that ogres do not live happily ever after.

Snow White appears more prominently in Shrek the Third, dressed in red. Prince Charming interrupts Fiona's baby shower after she gives her a dwarf as a gift to babysit the triplets, saying that she has six more at home. Stroke of genius Even though it's not as cathartic as the moment when Carl stumbles upon Ellie's scrapbook and decides to move on with his life, and instead merely illustrates why Carl becomes the man he is when we meet him, we have to go for the Married Life montage near the film's beginning.

The most moving, boldly brilliant four-and-a-half minutes of moviemaking we've seen in a long time, it retains the power to provoke tears even now. Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs Voiced by: Neil Patrick Harris Possibly the most random character on this list, Steve is and there's no easy way of describing this a monkey. Nothing random about that, admittedly.

And those thoughts mostly revolve around eating Gummi Bears, and doing what monkeys do, which is act like children hopped up on sugar and fizzy drinks. The master of the hilarious non sequitur, Steve's every appearance in this underrated gem is gold, and further proof that NPH can do no wrong. Stroke of genius The look of unrestrained, demented triumph on Steve's face near the end as he rips the still-beating heart out of the chest of his nemesis, a giant Gummi Bear, and pops it into his mouth.

Fun fact Steve was the star of his own game on the Cloudy promo website, where he attempted to read your mind. Generally, it worked, as long as you were thinking of potatoes. Spirited Away First Appearance: Spirited Away Voiced by: Rumi Hiragi, Daveigh Chase Miyazaki has a wealth of great characters, from bizarre gods to eccentric spirits and terrifying witches. But it's his heroines who are usually the best, and Spirited Away boasts the best of the lot.

shrek 2 meet the cast of duck

Over the course of her adventures Chihiro matures from a spoiled little brat into a mature and courageous young woman, helping others who are worse off than herself and eventually earning her own freedom and that of her enchanted parents. She also gets bonus points for getting a job - most animated characters are a bunch of benefit-scrounging layabouts.

Stroke of genius It's probably the scene where Chihiro has to help clean a terrifying and rather repellent "stink spirit", which is revealed under her ministrations to be a polluted river spirit, poor thing.

Fun fact Pixar's John Lasseter is well known to be a Miyazaki fan, but it's mutual: Jay Baruchel Yes, we've gone for Hiccup rather than his adorable dragon Toothless? Because he's a character we don't see enough of in animation: While the wise-cracking, geeky outsider is familiar in live-action teen movies, he's given a fresh breath of life here amid a town full of Vikings and plagued by dragons, and Hiccup's developing bond with Toothless is one of the most finely drawn friendships ever established in the genre.

Also, his awkward relationship with his father is much better than the average orphan story, with bonus points for the joke about his mother's breastplate. It's at the end of the film, where Hiccup wakes up in his bed to discover that he's lost his foot in the battle with the enormous dragon. He stares wordlessly for a moment, but after a single sigh refuses to dwell and - with Toothless' help - gets out of bed to try out his prosthetic. Fun fact The novel's version of the story is almost entirely different: Toothless is very small and brown, there's no giant dragon to fight in the last act and Hiccup remains whole.

To be honest, however, it's not as good. Fantastic Mr Fox First Appearance: Fantastic Mr Fox Voiced by: Eric Chase Anderson One of the few non-star voice actors to appear in Wes Anderson's stop-motion adaptation of Roald Dahl's book, Eric Chase Anderson nevertheless got perhaps the most amusing character in a cast of eccentrics.

He's a nephew of Mr Fox's, but his presence causes no end of grief for Fox's son Ash, who is thoroughly outshone by the polite, meditation-practicing, entirely self-sufficient cousin. While Ash gets the more obviously interesting character arc, Kristofferson's just so amusingly perfect that he keeps stealing the show - and of course he turns out not to be such an obnoxious little nerd after all. Stroke of genius Beating up the mole who tries to pick on his cousin Ash, first taking off his shoes so that his Kristofferson's mad martial arts skills don't kill him.

Fun fact Kristofferson is, as you'd expected, named after legendary singer and Blade star Kris Kristofferson, since Wes Anderson and writer Noah Baumbach are both fans of his work. Captain Hook Movie s: Peter Pan First Appearance: Hans Conried Maybe it's because Captain Hook started out on stage that he's so darn good at getting us all cheering and yelling at the screen - for the other guy.

A villain more adept at sneering you'd look hard to find, and as cold-blooded killers go it's hard to top him. But he's also a man of culture and some pretentions to finesse, making his all the scarier when he decides to just go for the throat. And it's a testament to this film that, while the character's been played a thousand times, this one feels like the original. Maybe it's that dashing red coat - we do love a man in uniform.

Stroke of genius The gibbering panic that overtakes the otherwise snarling bad guy whenever the sound of ticking comes near. Fun fact This was the last Disney film that all nine of the legendary animators the Nine Old Men worked on as directing animators. After this, they were spread across different concurrent projects at any given time. Mike Wasowski Movie s: Monsters Inc First Appearance: Monsters Inc Voiced by: Billy Crystal When it comes to Monsters, Inc.

You could go for Boo, arguably the cutest kid in movie history. Or Sulley, John Goodman's lovable walking rug of a monster. Or even Roz, the first evidence that Bob Petersen could do more than work behind the microphone.

But it's the refreshing, unforced jollity and decency of Billy Crystal's Mike Wazowski that just about wins out. Endearingly hapless, with a cavalier attitude towards paperwork, the manic wackiness of Wazowski provides the perfect counterbalance to Sulley's more lugubrious nature. And when he's funny, boy, is he funny. No wonder the dude goes into stand-up by the film's end. Oh, and we should also point out that Wazowski is effectively a walking eyeball just another excuse for the boys at Pixar to show that they can take any object or shape and invest it with emotion and life.

Stroke of genius The sweetness that's exposed when Wazowski or Googlie Bear, as he might also be known goes on a date with his beloved Celia.

It all goes wrong, naturally, but it's nice to see another side to the big goof-eyeball. Fun fact Mike has his own Facebook page. We suspect he gets an assistant to post for him. Jack Skellington Movie s: The Nightmare Before Christmas Voiced by: Chris Sarandon, Henry Sellick singing Culture clashes have always been dramatic meat for filmmakers, but this is a more imaginative take on it than most. And Jack Skellington is at the heart of it, good-hearted but profoundly ignorant of what he's messing with.

His obsession is not something you usually see in kid's cartoons - he's not a man on a noble mission but a weirdo fixated on something against reason, and it's his friend Sally who, like the audience, knows it's a bad idea and wants him to stop - but it's his flaws that make him human, first getting swept away despite himself and then, eventually, doing the right thing.

He also gets bonus points for owning animation's most adorable ghost dog, as Zero and his cute little Jack o' lantern nose couldn't belong with anyone truly evil. Stroke of genius The song "What's this", as Jack - accustomed as he is to the dark, twisted Halloween Town, tries to get his head around the sweetness and light of Christmas Town.

It's no wonder he gets things a bit mixed up. Fun fact Tim Burton who, please remember, did not direct came up with the idea for this film after seeing a department store swap straight from Halloween decorations to Christmas ones. His original story only included the characters of Jack, Zero and Santa Claus; the rest were added for the screen. It's all about the supporting cast, who upstage the ostensible leads every single time the camera turns their way.

Donkey - hyperactive, desperately insecure, unfailingly loyal - is one of the best of them. Eddie Murphy plays nerdier and sillier than his usual characters and, in profound contrast to his efforts in Norbit, it pays off in spades. Sure, we have yet to forgive him for making us wonder how a donkey and a dragon mate, but apart from that he's a raving success.

Stroke of genius The single best Donkey moment in the series is probably when Puss-in-Boots appears in Shrek 2, trying to wangle his way into Shrek's affections with his adorable kitty pose. We'd rather like to see that one. Aladdin First Appearance: The Arabian Nights, dating from the 10th century Voiced by: Robin Williams Ever been annoyed by a celebrity voice coming out of a cartoon's mouth? If so, blame this guy, because Robin Williams' electric voice performance as the Genie in this Disney fairytale set something of a fashion for star casting in animation.

What most of the copycats missed, however, was the fact that it wasn't Williams' star power that did the job here but his gift for comic improvisation - and the ability of Disney's animators, led by Genie supervising animator Eric Goldberg, to keep up with him - that made the Genie such a memorable, magical character.

Meet the Cast of Shrek 2 (Video ) - IMDb

Also, far too few animated characters turn themselves into rockets. Stroke of genius Probably the 'Prince Ali' musical number, which sees the Genie perform the main song but also transform himself into crowd members to start a hundred different rumours as Aladdin, disguised as a prince, makes his triumphal entry into the city. Fun fact Robin Williams was allowed to improvise much of his performance, which is pretty unusual in animation.

His initial recordings included about 52 separate characters, which Eric Goldberg then took and worked with, picking the funniest bits to animate. Les Triplettes de Belleville Voiced by: When her cyclist grandson is kidnapped by nefarious underworld biking fans, she pedals across oceans with only her faithful dog for company, enduring hardships without number to seek him out.

She also endures the all-frog diet of the eccentric triplets of Belleville before finally taking on gangsters and tycoons to rescue her prize.

Now that, ladies and gentlemen, is dedication.

The 50 Best Animated Movie Characters

Stroke of genius In an unusual approach to sports massage, Madame Souza massages her grandson's overworked calves with an egg beater. My Neighbour Totoro First Appearance: My Neighbour Totoro Voiced by: Hitoshi Takagi Cuddly, gentle and peace-loving, Totoro is a pure forest spirit who comes to the assistance of people in emotional need.

He and his small friends also make kick-ass stuffed toys. Created by Japanese animation king Hayao Miyazaki, his gang resemble a cross between a rabbit and a Moomin, but have a quirky personality all of their own - they carry around bags of acorns which they use to grow treesuse umbrellas and travel in a cat bus. But even amid such cuties, Totoro's round and cuddly self is still our favourite. Stroke of genius The beautiful, silent sequence where young heroine Satsuki stands beside Totoro at a bus stop during a storm.

Enjoying the sound the falling rain makes on his umbrella, the magical creature grins, then jumps up and down, shaking water from the trees above. Fun fact A Totoro plush toy appears briefly in Toy Story 3.

Animation's answer to Leonard Shelby, Dory is as sunny and good-natured as she is incapable of remembering your name for more than a few moments. Her short-term memory problems make for easy jokes within the context of the film, but as the story builds they acquire immense poignancy as she tries to overcome her limits and remember. Her triumphant realisation that she recognises the name Nemo is a moment of triumph on a par with Rocky conquering those darn steps, or the final mission in Top Gun.

You'll never root as hard for any other fish. Stroke of genius "I speak whale! Fun Fact The myth that goldfish have a memory of only seconds is not, in fact, true. Experiments with mazes and with feeding routines have shown that their memories last substantially longer - months rather than moments. Cruella de Vil Movies: Betty Lou Gerson About as subtle as a Simon Cowell critique, the clue to the true nature of Dodie Smith's great villainess can be found in her name, like Dr.

In other words, beware a woman named de Vil, who smokes liberally, cackles malevolently at the drop of a hat, swans around in a car that has a King Kong-sized carbon footprint, and wants to make a fur coat out of the skins of gorgeous little Dalmatian puppies.

shrek 2 meet the cast of duck

Oh, and she's called Devil. But it's the OTT nature of Cruella capitalism run rampant, greed gnarled into a snarling mask of hatred - that makes her so memorable, and has sustained the character through animated sequels, live action movies where Glenn Close had an absolute blast and even on Broadway.

If she doesn't scare you, so the song goes, no evil thing will. Stroke of genius Her unique approach to keeping her two henchmen, Jasper and Horace, on her side, constantly slapping them, threatening them and berating them for admittedly catastrophic failures. Someone needs to give her a reality show, quick smart.

List of Shrek characters - Wikipedia

She could buy a Dalmatian farm at that rate. Coraline First Appearance: Coraline, a novel by Neil Gaiman, Voiced by: Dakota Fanning Neil Gaiman's dark-tinged children's tale combines perfectly with stop-motion genius Henry Selick's signature style, and Coraline herself pops off the screen even without the 3D glasses.

She's a fully-realised kid, prone to annoying her parents and going off in a huff and being irritated by a neighbouring geek. But she's also smart, capable and ultimately fearless in seeing off the dark forces that threaten to tear her away from her family, showing that there's more to her than being a brat. She's also a masterpiece of stop-motion animation, with thousands of facial expressions and spot-on pre-adolescent body language.

Stroke of genius It's the scene where Coraline hangs her hands around a doorknob and swings back and forth, pestering her father for attention while he's trying to work. Fun fact To weave the cloth and knit the jumpers used for the film's puppets, the team had to use needles as fine as human hair. Now that's what you call detail work.

Akira First Appearance: Akira manga, from onwards Voiced by: Nozomu Sazaki You know how motorcycle gang members are. Tetsuo's always been the odd man out, reliant on his friend Kaneda for support and protection. But when he is picked up by government scientists, and starts experiencing strange headaches, it becomes clear that Tetsuo may have more going on upstairs than anyone realised.

It's the slow and nightmarish realisation of what that power involves that sets Tetsuo's story apart from most other animation, and his descent into a sort of madness is infinitely compelling - even if, as is traditional with manga, you have only the haziest idea what's going on.

Stroke of genius It's probably the scene where Tetsuo's girlfriend, Kaori, tries to talk to him after he's started to go super-mental, regrowing his own arm and on the run from the government. Fun fact Wondering what's happened to that live-action Akira that's been talked about for so long? Well, it's still apparently a go project, with producer Andrew Lazar saying earlier this year that a new screenwriter had been brought aboard.

Toy Story Voiced by: Tim Allen The beauty of Buzz Lightyear is that, beneath the superficiality of the initial premise he's an utterly delusional toy who thinks he's a real Space Ranger there's real emotional depth and endless capacity for reinvention.

Witness Toy Story 3's neat reprogramming gag, wherein Buzz becomes a flamenco-flecked Spanish-language toy, complete with an eye for the ladies and neat dance moves. But we love Buzz for so much more than that. We love him because of his bluster. We love him because of his never-say-die spirit. We love him because he's a leader of plastic men. We love him because he's faintly ridiculous. We love him because Tim Allen's macho voice work is so perfect that it almost removes the universe's need for William Shatner to exist.

We love him because he has a little light that blinks.