Giammetti valentino relationship trust

New film honors Valentino, last king of fashion | Reuters

giammetti valentino relationship trust

Assouline presents the autobiography of Giancarlo Giammetti, Valentino's trusted business partner for fifty years. Beginning with his childhood in Rome under. Valentino and Giammetti sold their company in for a reported $ . always compensated by this amazing relationship I had with Valentino. .. Visconti trusted Valentino and I to be good for Helmut because Helmut. Giancarlo Giammetti—for 45 years the power behind the Valentino fashion empire, “I was just 30 when the physical part of our relationship ended, and it was.

I loved seeing the photos of you and Vava from around when you first met, when you were 22 and he was Valentino came from fashion and had been in Paris, but with his character, he was not really a manager, so we created this and tried to learn here and there with a lot of courage, but also ambition—and, as I said, we were a bit naive.

We were smiling a lot. People had fun in having us around and helped us. We wanted to do something different, to bring a new speed. I think that this was one of the keys of our success. I eventually discovered that I had 57, pictures, and so we went into the archives and made a very precise organization of it all, so today, if you want to know exactly when a picture was taken, who is in it, and have it in high-definition, it can be done. So it was a bit of a combination of being ready for it technically, but then also being ready because the world was ready to get it.

At the same time, it can be scary to reveal aspects of your personal life. I know that I have a very conservative approach in terms of what I choose to reveal.

New film honors Valentino, "last king of fashion"

Did you find it difficult? Were you worried at all about giving people this window into your life? Well, the difference is that you are young and you have to protect your future. That is not the case for me—I just have to tell my past. Where do you draw the line now? But I have not much more to say than what I say in the book, you know? How do you feel like fashion and glamour have evolved since then?

Then there was another group in America that was the group of Andy Warhol and Halston and the Liza [Minnelli], which was completely day and night with what was going on in Europe.

We always loved to move from our chateau to the Studio They were still separate worlds, but then, little by little, the two would start to become closer, so the ladies from one world went into the Studio 54, and the people of the Studio 54 came to the chateau. But now, different worlds mingle more. So you feel like nowadays fashion represents a greater mingling? I guess today the glamour comes from different things. The glamour today comes from people on the red carpet, from the TV, from the … What do you call it?

Instagram also makes the culture of a community. I loved seeing photos from your childhood in the book. You say in the book that your life began when you met Valentino, but it was great to get a glimpse of who you were for your first 22 years.

You were a child during World War II. Do you feel like your memories of being in Italy during World War II had an impact on the rest of your life? I was too young.

I do have memories, as I say in the book, of a bombing, of the alarm, and of us all running down the stairs to something called the refuge, where you would feel safe because it was below the ground. I remember those things. My father was once shot at. I was so upset by that. That was war, you know? I have to say that I was lucky to be very young. I think my brother and my sister would have a different opinion, but I never felt that terrible moment that Italy would touch my future.

How do you think you changed when you met Valentino? Did meeting him teach you new things about yourself? Well, I was a very spoiled kid—very Italian, very Roman. You were a rascal. Yeah, but in a funny way, you know? My first car, a Fiatwas given to me by my father—it was that kind of life, which was very bourgeois in Italy at the time … I mean, how bourgeois is bourgeois in Italy today? To all of us, Paris was the city of sin. I remember the first time I discovered that there were drag queens in Paris.

You would see it in the papers. There was one super-famous one in Paris who looked like Marilyn Monroe. This is in Paris?

A few months later, we went to Paris. So all my life changed after we met. Yes, maybe I was. I was not sleeping before, but it was really more about finding a different life. I can tell you one: You should get out of this kind of life. Visconti is sorry, but he had to leave. I never told him, but not because I was ashamed.

It was just that it was removed from my memory and came back later on, maybe. Visconti trusted Valentino and I to be good for Helmut because Helmut was completely out of control—I think he thought that seeing the way that our relationship was, so steady between Valentino and me, could help Helmut.

So Visconti was happy that we would go out a lot with him. I ended up seeing Luchino a lot. Something else you mention in the book is that when you first got a camera, it was sort of a luxury item and not everyone had them. Obviously, the world is so different today, where pretty much everybody who has a phone has a camera. But what was it that first drew you to photography? Why did you start taking photos? I bought one, though, because I wanted to start documenting the things that I was seeing and noticing around me.

There was also this kind of easy communication that you had with the Polaroid. You could scratch the Polaroid with your key while it was developing, and it would come up with the drawings and color. It was actually because of Andy [Warhol] that I got my first Polaroid. I also started to write a diary—some of the pages from it are in the book. But documenting things in these ways became part of my daily life.

It was just to remember. The Polaroid was a bit like what Instagram is now. It feels like it can become very commercial as well. Do you consider yourself nostalgic? When you do a book that spans 50 years of your life, of course, nostalgia can be there. But neither me nor Valentino are particularly nostalgic. I had those albums and diaries for years, but I never looked at them.

I had to do it for the book, though, and then I was looking mostly just to tell my story. I know how secretly romantic you are. When I see all the people laughing and having fun who are not here anymore, my nostalgia for them is there, of course—I miss them. He then told me the whole story—he remembered everything about the dress. I believe everything he says—always. Even my failures in my personal life, in a love affair and things like this, I was always compensated by this amazing relationship I had with Valentino.

So I'm not very good at judging failure. I thought one of the best lines in the book—one that resonated with me most—was when you wrote that you dedicated yourself to letting Valentino be Valentino, to letting him be free and clearing the world for him and protecting him as an artist. It was something that came naturally.

I start out with him so early in my life—I was 22—so I was not very able to think about my own personality. All of my interests, all my efforts, all my passion was about Valentino, so it became almost normal that I did everything possible to help him. And then when I started to discover his limitations—that he was not interested in the marketing, he was not interested in the advertising—I took over, because the company was growing and somebody had to do it.

So little by little, he felt free to just do what he wanted and I was the rest. But it was not a big effort—it was not something that I regret. I've never been somebody looking for the spotlight. Even from the beginning, I knew that it was not my position: You're both pretty sparkly. The spotlight was not for me—I was not interested.

I was just working to try to make everything good in my own possibilities, although I made some things that are not to be proud of. Are you referring to the Valentino toilet seat that was made in the s?

In the book, I talk about a big disappointment I had from somebody who was very important in the company. It was not a friend, but somebody who really had a high position, and he did something really quite amazing I cannot say it in the book or discuss this because we had to go to court—but for me, this was a big failure. After the shock of that happening, I decided that I would take care of every detail, so I took the old position that this guy had and made it mine, and I can tell you that from that moment, the company grew from one to probably ten just because it was revenge.

giammetti valentino relationship trust

It was my pride going crazy. And, of course, no one is going to protect the company or Valentino better than you. I loved seeing the photos of you and Vava from around when you first met, when you were 22 and he was I was just trying to imagine what the two of you would've been like then and how hungry that you must have been to build what you built together. Don't forget that I didn't come from fashion. Valentino came from fashion and had been in Paris, but with his character, he was not really a manager, so we created this and tried to learn here and there with a lot of courage, but also ambition—and, as I said, we were a bit naive.

We were smiling a lot. People had fun in having us around and helped us. Vreeland famously adored us—until she died, she was still calling us "the boys. We wanted to do something different, to bring a new speed. I think that this was one of the keys of our success. You've said that until recently, it never would have occurred to you to share these photos with the world or to share this part of your life.

It was maybe more technical than romantic, because I'd started to worry if I had enough pictures. I eventually discovered that I had 57, pictures, and so we went into the archives and made a very precise organization of it all, so today, if you want to know exactly when a picture was taken, who is in it, and have it in high-definition, it can be done. Also, with the birth of Facebook and Instagram, you see that you can put up a picture and people react, and I discovered that some of the pictures that are put up had a great impact on people because suddenly they're brought back to a certain period or a certain moment.

When you put up a picture of Bianca Jagger, for example, it was like, "Oh my god! So it was a bit of a combination of being ready for it technically, but then also being ready because the world was ready to get it. At the same time, it can be scary to reveal aspects of your personal life. I know that I have a very conservative approach in terms of what I choose to reveal.

Did you find it difficult? Were you worried at all about giving people this window into your life? Well, the difference is that you are young and you have to protect your future.

That is not the case for me—I just have to tell my past. But I don't know Now, you scare me. But was there anything that was totally off limits to people now that you've kind of moved the line for your privacy? Where do you draw the line now? Well, I had to protect some people, so there are people who don't appear because I think that I should protect them for one reason or another.

And maybe I could talk more and show less, and tell more stories—because there were so many—or tell more opinions, which I don't give much in the book, about the world of fashion today and things like this. But I have not much more to say than what I say in the book, you know? That's interesting because you and Vava built your empire at what I think was probably the greatest and most glamorous moment in fashion in the '60s.

How do you feel like fashion and glamour have evolved since then? It's clear that in the '60s and the '70s, the big glamour was more European. Then there was another group in America that was the group of Andy Warhol and Halston and the Liza [Minnelli], which was completely day and night with what was going on in Europe.

We always loved to move from our chateau to the Studio They were still separate worlds, but then, little by little, the two would start to become closer, so the ladies from one world went into the Studio 54, and the people of the Studio 54 came to the chateau.

That's the difference now: But now, different worlds mingle more. So you feel like nowadays fashion represents a greater mingling? I guess today the glamour comes from different things. The glamour today comes from people on the red carpet, from the TV, from the What do you call it?

So where the world was once about Jackie Kennedy, today we're at Kim Kardashian. It's there and you have to accept it. Instagram also makes the culture of a community. It's not anymore a culture of things that you learn about for months or for years.

  • Giancarlo Giammetti

It's a three-minute culture, and there's so much information that you have to concentrate on in one picture, in one line, in one tweet That's the glamorous now. I loved seeing photos from your childhood in the book. You say in the book that your life began when you met Valentino, but it was great to get a glimpse of who you were for your first 22 years.

You were a child during World War II. Do you feel like your memories of being in Italy during World War II had an impact on the rest of your life? I was too young. I do have memories, as I say in the book, of a bombing, of the alarm, and of us all running down the stairs to something called the refuge, where you would feel safe because it was below the ground. I remember those things. My father was once shot at. There's that story in the book about how your father was in a car with someone who got shot.

I was so upset by that. That was war, you know? But I was young and couldn't begin to understand all that.

giammetti valentino relationship trust

I have to say that I was lucky to be very young. I think my brother and my sister would have a different opinion, but I never felt that terrible moment that Italy would touch my future.

How do you think you changed when you met Valentino?

Giancarlo Giammetti - Press - Valentino Garavani Museum

Did meeting him teach you new things about yourself? Well, I was a very spoiled kid—very Italian, very Roman. In fact, my life was about trying to not study, trying to not go to university You were a rascal. Yeah, but in a funny way, you know? My first car, a Fiatwas given to me by my father—it was that kind of life, which was very bourgeois in Italy at the time I mean, how bourgeois is bourgeois in Italy today?

giammetti valentino relationship trust

To all of us, Paris was the city of sin. I remember the first time I discovered that there were drag queens in Paris. You would see it in the papers. There was one super-famous one in Paris who looked like Marilyn Monroe. I just went, "Oh my god! This is in Paris? So I did my exams but, unfortunately, my grandfather—my mother's father—died, and I was never able to go.

A few months later, we went to Paris. So all my life changed after we met. Yes, maybe I was. I was not sleeping before, but it was really more about finding a different life.

You mention in the book that there are some things that, amazingly, Valentino didn't know about you before he read it. I can tell you one: He didn't know before reading the book that I had gone to see Luchino Visconti to try to work with him. I mean, I was a normal kid, but I always had something in my mind that said, "You should get out of here. You should get out of this kind of life. I said, "Why can I not meet him? I remember I was very nervous and rang the door, but the butler answer and told me, "Oh, no.

Visconti is sorry, but he had to leave. I don't know why this is one of the memories that I put in the book, or why in the moment, I thought it'd be nice to write this, but Valentino never knew about that. I never told him, but not because I was ashamed. It was just that it was removed from my memory and came back later on, maybe. Ultimately, though, I met Visconti and we were friends with him because we were very good friends with his boyfriend, Helmut Berger [Austrian actor who appeared in Visconti's films].

Visconti trusted Valentino and I to be good for Helmut because Helmut was completely out of control—I think he thought that seeing the way that our relationship was, so steady between Valentino and me, could help Helmut.

So Visconti was happy that we would go out a lot with him. I ended up seeing Luchino a lot. I was there to tell him, "You remember that little rat who came to your door? Something else you mention in the book is that when you first got a camera, it was sort of a luxury item and not everyone had them. Obviously, the world is so different today, where pretty much everybody who has a phone has a camera.

But what was it that first drew you to photography? Why did you start taking photos? Well, it's not just that the camera was such an inaccessible luxury thing—they were just, as you said, less common. I bought one, though, because I wanted to start documenting the things that I was seeing and noticing around me.

There was also this kind of easy communication that you had with the Polaroid. When I say that I miss the Polaroid, it's because it was really amazing how it was such a subject of easy conversation.

It was not just an artist's thing—anybody could have fun taking pictures. You could scratch the Polaroid with your key while it was developing, and it would come up with the drawings and color. It was actually because of Andy [Warhol] that I got my first Polaroid. I also started to write a diary—some of the pages from it are in the book. But documenting things in these ways became part of my daily life.